Features

Socialism and Surplus: Why Planning Cannot Overthrow Capitalism

As the economic crisis continues along with militant action against it, the idea of socialist planning has emerged from the grave. However, at bottom, socialism is subject to the same compulsions as capitalism. Its planning is the planning of the management of surplus; the category which is the foundation of domination. If it might attenuate some of the most vicious results of the capitalist hell, it cannot help us escape it. Read more »

The Big Sleep

For nine days this past December, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach lay sleeping. Fifteen container vessels sat anchored off the coast. We were told that "featherbedding" will not be tolerated and the management complains of operational "nightmares". The supply chain oneiric aspires toward an efficiency it can never obtain under capitalism, but it won't ever be able to believe this. Instead, it intends to produce/instrumentalize more docile and flexible humans—and fewer of them. Read more »

Empire Logistics

Empire Logistics is a collaborative initiative to research and articulate (through online mapping, video, text and other media) the impact and 'externalized costs'—human, economic, social and environmental— of the international goods movement industry. An initial area of focus has been “The Inland Empire,” an area of Southern California that was hit hardest by the subprime mortgage crisis of 2008 and the ensuing depression. The Inland Empire continues to face some of the highest home foreclosure rates in the country, staggering unemployment far above the national average, a rise in homelessness, and a decline in the median wage. Read more »

Administrative Totalitarianism at the UC and the Necessity of Direct Action by Faculty

The fact is that the faculty have far more power than do the students of the UC system, though we have been far more reluctant to use it. So students are fighting on our behalf (if we care about the public character of the university) against privatization. And they are thus bearing the burden of administrative repression. But the administration cannot repress the faculty of the university in the same fashion, if we act together. Read more »

Occupation as Political Form

We already occupy everything, so how can we occupy everything? What matters is the minimal difference, the shift in perspective the injunction to occupy effects. It’s a shift crucial to occupation as a political form that organizes the incompatibility between the people and capitalism. It enjoins us to occupy in a different mode, to assert our presence in and for itself, for the common, not for the few, the one percent. “Occupy Everything’s” shift in perspective highlights and amplifies the gap between what has been and what can be, between what “capitalist realism” told us what the only alternative and what the actuality of movement forced us to wake up to. The gap it names is the gap of communist desire, a collective desire for collectivity: we occupy everything because it is already ours in common. Read more »